Why Moms Should Ask For Help

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Life for moms can be challenging. The responsibilities, financial pressures and relationship strife all mount rapidly. It’s easy to feel totally overwhelmed

 

Fortunately, there are other people in the world who can help and offer support. When you’re a mom, a problem shared really is a problem halved. 

 

Here are some of the reasons why moms shouldn’t be afraid to ask for help when they need it. 

 

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Being A Mom Is Humbling

 

Before you are a mom, you aren’t responsible for the life of another person. But once you cross that threshold, things change rapidly. All of a sudden, you feel the full weight of another life in your hands. 

 

It’s critical to put pride aside when you’re a mom and accept help from other people. It’s okay not to manage everything yourself. You have a newfound appreciation for how the process of becoming a mother changes you as a person. When you reach out, you accept your limitations in a way you never would have done before. 

 

You Can’t Do It All

 

Even if everything is going well for you in your life, you can’t do it all. No mom can. There will be setbacks and circumstances that prevent you from being everything to everyone. 

 

Take some time to look at your life. Ask yourself whether you really can juggle your career and be a mom at the same time. If you can’t do both, reach out for support. It’s available.

 

Many moms get into the habit of pressuring themselves to do everything. They believe that they should be able to balance all their responsibilities on their own, without involving the community at all. After all, people on social media do it, so why can’t they?

 

Of course, this attitude leads to exhaustion and burnout. Moms that don’t take a break are chronically tired and can’t give their full attention to anything. 

 

It’s Good To Be Vulnerable Sometimes

 

Being vulnerable feels awful because you’re opening yourself up to other people. But if you are brave enough to do it, it brings its own rewards. Having that kind of honesty with the community reduces your sense of shame and helps you get the support you need. 

 

Vulnerability also shows that you appreciate yourself as a person. You’re not willing to load yourself up with responsibilities you cannot possibly take on board. It’s a good lesson for your kids, too. You’re showing them that it’s okay to be vulnerable and ask for help, not bottle everything up inside.

 

It Makes Sense To Have A Break

 

Being on the go all the time is bad for the mind, body and spirit. You need opportunities in your life to take a break from the constant pressures you face. 


That’s why it makes a lot of sense to take a break from time to time. One way to do this is with the help of an au pair. What is an au pair? Basically, someone you trust who can look after your kids from time to time. 

 

Remember, you can’t always give, give, and give some more. Sometimes, you need to take a little time to recharge your batteries and do something for yourself.

 

That’s where sharing the load can really help. You’re not taking on all the responsibility yourself all the time. You are also building your own energy. 

 

You Find Out More About Yourself

 

When you’re a mom, you learn a lot about yourself and what you’re capable of. But that’s only possible if you spend time alone. If you’re constantly serving the needs of others, you don’t have any opportunity to reflect on who you are as an individual. 

 

It’s important to keep track of who you are. That’s because it can change significantly during pregnancy and raising a child. You often define yourself by your title or “mom” or “parent” without any reference to the person you were before. You’re so involved in the new role, you forget all about your old self. 

 

Children Will Learn That It’s Okay To Ask For Help

 

Children will also learn that it’s okay to ask for help if you are willing to do it yourself. Kids react to how we act ourselves. If we keep things bottled up, they’re likely to do the same. If we’re open about our problems, they are much more likely to come forward. 

 

Stress Can Cause Illness

 

Being stressed for a day or two probably won’t hurt you a great deal. But having constant gnawing stress and pressure in your life will eventually lead to problems and make you sick. The human immune system can’t function in a constant state of fight-or-flight without breaking down in one way or another. 

 

You’ll Pass The Stress On To Your Kids

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Worse still, if you are stressed as a parent, you’ll pass that stress and ill-feeling onto your kids. They’ll start to feel what you feel and may begin to develop anxiety around your moods. 

 

Kids pick up on parental stress. They’re looking for consistency, so if you don’t provide it, they’ll absorb that negative energy and they won’t know how to handle it. 

 

If you’re worried that you’re not doing enough for your kids, consider taking a break. Usually, people can feel when something isn’t quite right with their mind and body. 

 

You’re Struggling Physically

 

Motherhood is also a physically demanding experience. Giving birth, carrying children around and breastfeeding all take their toll and make you feel tired. 

 

Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to get help if you are struggling physically. In fact, it’s one of the easiest problems to solve because technology, not people, can step in and take up some of the slack. 


For instance, if you’re struggling with breastfeeding, you can get creams, pumps and other mammary instruments to keep you comfortable. You can also buy various pouches for children, rather than physically carrying them around the whole time. 

 

In conclusion, if you are finding life difficult as a mother, reach out. Don’t be afraid to ask the people around you for help. 

 

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Kori

Content Creator at Kori at Home
Kori is a late diagnosed neurodivergent mom. She is currently located in Albany, NY where she is raising a neurodiverse family. Her older daughter is non-speaking autistic (and also has ADHD and Anxiety) and her youngest daughter is HSP/Gifted. A blogger, podcaster, writer, and coach; Kori shares neurodivergent life in a neurotypical world while helping others to do the same. As an empath, HSP, and highly intuitive individual, Kori brings her own life experiences as an autistic woman combined with her adventures in momming to bring you the day-to-day of her life at home. Kori is on a mission to empower moms of autistic children to make informed parenting decisions with confidence and conviction.

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