How to Protect Your Child's Emotional Well Being 2

How to Protect Your Child’s Emotional Well Being

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As parents, we want to protect our children from practically everything. And while this may seem impossible; we can protect them in certain areas. Mostly, that covers things like physical needs. But have you considered how to¬†protect your child’s emotional well being?

How to Protect Your Child's Emotional Well Being 3

In our effort to balance very full and hectic lives with our families and our jobs, we may have been neglecting an all-important facet of our child’s life: their emotional well-being.

The first three years of a child’s life is a critical time for a child. And the trauma of changing child care providers or having a ‘part-time’ parent float in and out of their life can be very traumatic and destabilizing for them.

For some parents, that means making a decision for one to stay at home full time with the children.

It’s imperative that parents, educators, involved adults and care providers make a concerted joint effort to ensure that a child’s emotional needs are met on a daily basis, just as their physical needs are.

The effects of not meeting a child’s emotional needs, especially during the first three years of life, can have devastating consequences. Violent, disruptive or defiant behaviors can result.

How to Protect Your Child’s Emotional Well-Being

The first three years of life are critical in a number of ways. This is when bonding and emotional separation takes place. If there are interruptions in either of these processes, misbehaviors from the child can result.

This can later have an affect on their relationships later in life and hinder them in developing their own healthy relationships as adolescents or adults.

During the first three years of life, the brain goes through its most rapid development ever, the likes of which will never been experienced again.

By the time they are three years old, a child’s brain is already ‘hardwired’ from the experiences they’ve had to that point. It’s imperative that these be loving, supportive, safe, positive experiences so the brain will be conditioned to expect positive things.

If those experiences have been frightening, hurtful, abusive, or dangerous, then the brain is conditioned to expect negative occurrences.

When it comes to parenting, we want to protect our children as much as possible. Here's how to protect your child's emotional well-being.

It’s critical that parents, caregivers and other involved adults make a concerted effort to make sure the child’s emotional needs are met in a positive, constructive and healthy manner.

Parents should ensure that the child’s care providers are stable and consistent, and don’t move them around to different childcare providers during this important phase.

Ensure a child feels safe and secure with structured and consistent schedules and routines.

Be sure to spend as much quality time with your child at this time as possible, regardless of your otherwise busy and hectic lifestyle. A child can sense that such a schedule is stressful to you and it can become a frightening or confusing element for them.

Therefore it’s important to take time out to reassure them that you’re never too busy for them.

Remember that your child’s emotional well-being is just as important as their physical, so do your part to ensure your child knows he’s growing up safe, secure, treasured and loved.

Presence, not presents.

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Kori

Content Creator at Kori at Home
Kori is an autistic mom who also happens to have ADHD and Anxiety. She is currently located in Albany, NY where she is raising a neurodivergent family. Her older daughter is non-speaking autistic (and also has ADHD and Anxiety) and her youngest daughter is HSP/Gifted. As an empath, HSP, and highly intuitive individual, Kori brings her own life experiences as an autistic woman combined with her adventures in momming to bring you the day-to-day of her life at home. Kori provides life coaching services for neurodivergent women (and those who identify as women) as well as Oracle card reading, Tarot card readings, and energy healing.

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