Moving When You’re an Autistic Mom

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Moving is one of the most stressful experiences anyone can go through, let alone a mom and an autistic mom. All the breaks in routine, the mess, the people involved and constant chaos— it’s a nightmare if you’re not prepared. Moving as an autistic mom, especially with an autistic child, requires careful planning, preparation, and support to ensure everyone involved is safe and comfortable throughout the process. Here are some helpful insights related to moving as an Autistic mom. 

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Plan Early

 

As with any significant change, planning can help reduce stress levels and make the process smoother. Ideally, you should start planning for a move at least six months in advance to allow yourself ample time to get everything sorted. See what kind of schedule your neurotypical peers use and add a few months. It will help keep you organized and well-prepared for the challenges of moving and minimize any potential issues for yourself and your family members.

 

It’s helpful to organize everything but also to get acclimated to the idea of moving. Slowly accepting a change will help it feel less like a sudden interruption to your life and its natural progression. 

 

Your planning should include organizing everything beforehand. For example, you can keep all your necessary documentation in one safe place, such as a fireproof lockbox. It will make the transition to your new home as smooth as possible, especially as financial and legal paperwork comes into the equation.

 

Ask For Help

 

One of the best ways to reduce the stress and anxiety that moving can cause is to ask for help. Whether it’s friends, family members, or DFW realtors, assistance is paramount to simplifying the move. In addition, it will lighten the load to get help with the physical task of moving or the messy and overwhelming legal side of things.

 

Additionally, if you have young children, you may consider hiring a professional to assist with the move. It is especially important if you have a child who is highly sensitive or autistic. Just like you need help, your child might as well, and it’s worth investing in a safety net. You don’t want to become overwhelmed by a move and not guarantee your child’s well-being. Without the pressure of everybody else’s well-being on your shoulders, you can feel safe taking care of your own needs.

 

Take Care Of Yourself

 

Moving can be highly stressful, and since many adults on the spectrum are already prone to stress, it can cause feelings of being overwhelmed and even trigger anxiety. For this reason, taking care of yourself and minimizing the stress you feel during the moving process is essential.

 

 Taking care of yourself may include taking breaks from the responsibility of organizing the move or delegating some of your work to family members. It could also involve taking some time off from work, if possible. Alternatively, if you work from home, you may want to perform a reduced work schedule during the moving process. Additionally, it’s essential to stay hydrated and eat a healthy diet during this process. This will help you maintain your energy levels and minimize the amount of stress you feel. 

 

Moving is complicated for anyone; there’s no need to make it harder on yourself by “toughing it out”. 

 

Conclusion

 

For an autistic mom, moving seems like a nightmare. A rapidly shifting routine filled with possible pitfalls and the world’s weight on your shoulders is sure to send shivers down your spine. However, with careful planning, and the help of a support network, it is possible to minimize the stress and anxiety associated with moving. With the proper safety net in place, there’s no reason why moving shouldn’t be a smooth and enjoyable process for you and your child. 

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Kori

Content Creator at Kori at Home
Kori is a late diagnosed neurodivergent mom. She is currently located in Albany, NY where she is raising a neurodiverse family. Her older daughter is non-speaking autistic (and also has ADHD and Anxiety) and her youngest daughter is HSP/Gifted. A blogger, podcaster, writer, and coach; Kori shares neurodivergent life in a neurotypical world while helping others to do the same. As an empath, HSP, and highly intuitive individual, Kori brings her own life experiences as an autistic woman combined with her adventures in momming to bring you the day-to-day of her life at home. Kori is on a mission to empower moms of autistic children to make informed parenting decisions with confidence and conviction.

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